wibiya widget

Sunday, April 26, 2009

Conversations w/ L Divine


1. As a person what is your inspiration to write?
My inspiration for writing comes from daily events, usually interactions I have with or about young people, women in particular, of African descent. I also write because it helps in my personal healing process and hopefully my readers have a similar experience when reading the novels.

2. When did you discover you loved to write?

As a young child, about the same time that I found a love for reading...they go hand in hand.

3. What was your first written piece and how did it feel to have accomplished such a task?

The first written piece that I can recall is a poem I wrote in elementary school. I can't remember the name (my step-mother still has it somewhere) but I know it was about me wanting to be an attorney or president when I grew up. No one told me that being a writer was ever an option. It won a prize but I don't remember all of the details. I just remember hanging it on the bedroom door until it fell off. It felt so good that writing became addictive.

4. An Author’s career can be a difficult task, so how do you get into the zone to write your next book?

I approach my writing like any other job: I wake up in the morning, do my mama thing and then I go to work. I have a word/page count I need to make every day and keep it moving, just like that. I already have the stories outlined and I just write to my outlines, for the most part. The inspiration is always there. Making time to follow through with the inspired thoughts is the challenge.

5. Taking it back to your debut novel, how did it feel to hold your first book in your hand?

I can't describe the feeling in full...elated maybe? I can still remember thumbing though the fresh cut pages and smelling the newness of my words in print, cover to cover. It felt satisfying.

6. Other then writing what is one of the things you love to do?

I love to cook, baking mostly.

7. When is all said and done what mark do you want to leave in the literary industry?

I want to bridge the gap between the young adult population and the literary/academic community, leaving a positive black her story series for girls (and boys) to relate to. Having our own reflection in the major literary market is huge and I’m glad to be a part of this major accomplishment.

Visit the author at http://www.myspace.com/ldivine

Saturday, April 18, 2009

Conversations w/ Donna Hill


1. As a person what is your inspiration to write?

My inspiration to write is an overwhelming desire to tell stories, to create people and places that will touch the reader in a variety of ways. My mind and spirit is constantly filled with ideas and 'what ifs' and writing is my way of releasing those ideas.

2. When did you discover you loved to write?

As far back as I can remember. I was always a reader and spent hours in the library, reading everything I could get my hands on from the time I was old enough to go to the library alone. Reading was my passion and my writing was an outgrowth of all that I had taken in. I wanted to do with words the same thing that writers that I read did to me--enchant.

3. What was your first written piece and how did it feel to have accomplished such a task?

Hmmm, my first written piece was an article for a small independent magazine that has since gone out of print. It was pretty cool to see my name beneath title of the article. That was way back in 1986-87. My first short story was published in 1987. My first novel in 1990.

4. A Author’s career can be a difficult task, so how do you get into the zone to write your next book?

Like any other job there are days when I have to make myself sit down and do the work. Some days the words flow like a waterfall, other days I'm a stopped up drain!

5. Taking it back to your debut novel, how did it feel to hold your first book in your hand?

It was absolutely awesome! It was a validation that if you work hard for something that you believe in you can make it happen.

6. Other then writing what is one of the things you love to do?

Stretch out across my bed and zone out on TV. LOL

7. When is all said and done what mark do you want to leave in the literary industry?

I hope that when it's all said and done readers will be able to say "she was a damned good storyteller."

Visit Donna Hill at www.donnahill.com

Monday, April 13, 2009

Conversations w/ Mark Lacy


1. As a person what is your inspiration to write?

I have many inspirations when it comes to writing. It actually does not
take much to influence my pen to meet the pad. I can write per something
someone said or did. Or I can write from a simple notion churned via a
fleeting thought.

2. When did you discover you loved to write?

I believe I was in high school taking world literature when my knack for
creative writing was uncovered.

3. What was your first written piece and how did it feel to have accomplished
such a task?

If I can remember correctly, I wrote my first poem when I was in high
school as an assignment. I must honestly say, it felt pretty doggone good
even though I was obligated to do it per my instructor.

4. An Author’s career can be a difficult task, so how do you get into the zone
to write your next book?

I do not feel that there is one cookie cutter method. Different things
work for different authors. On nights when I simply do not feel like
writing anything, I have to tell myself that "this is what I do...so do
it." Re-motivation is crucial in the world of writing. I look for
creative ways to get that lyrical engine revving. So whatever works on a
certain day, I go with it.

5. Taking it back to your debut novel, how did it feel to hold your first book
in your hand?

I am actually working on a book of fiction short stories now. However when
my first book of poetry was published some five years ago, after everything
finally soaked in, I was humble and felt very blessed to have reached a
milestone that millions across the world are vying for. Regardless of how
many works are published, the euphoria is always fresh when the end product
is manifest.

6. Other then writing what is one of the things you love to do?

I love performing spoken word and poetry.

7. When is all said and done what mark do you want to leave in the literary
industry?

I actually haven't really thought about leaving a mark per se; but my
ultimate desire is to allow everyone to know that I gave my absolute best
in becoming a better writer and supporter for those just coming into the
game.

Visit the author at www.marclacy.com/

Friday, April 10, 2009

Conversations w/ Patricia Neely Dorsey


Celebrate the South Blog Tour
with Patricia Neely-Dorsey
April 5-11, 2009

Patricia Neely-Dorsey's Reflections: Shelling Peas

Shelling peas is one of those "things southern" that almost every southerner has had some experience with. It was and often remains just a part of the lifestyle, especially in "the country". We Southerners love good food and it's preparation is serious business! (smile) Preparing good food is an art and labor of love for many.

The preparation process often begins with procuring some of the freshest produce to be found, usually, from a personal garden, a friend's garden or a farmer's market. So, if you have a bunch of peas that don't come already shelled in a neat little package, those peas need shelling! Oftentimes, in my childhood, this duty was relegated to the children. With the chore at hand, we simply made it a part of our play . We turned it into fun!

SHELLING PEAS
It's summertime in the country,
And the kids buzz around like bees;
But, when that silver tub is place on the porch,
It's time for shelling peas.
From the smallest to the oldest,
It's something we'd all do;
At first, of course, the little ones,
Didn't have a clue.
They'd watch to see just how it went,
And soon , they'd give a try;
Then look amazed as fingers stained,
As though dipped in purple dye.
When we'd first get started,
It seemed an insurmountable chore;
There looked like half a million peas,
Or maybe even more.
But, after we all got the flow,
We'd turn it into fun;
We'd have a race to see just who
Would be the first one done.
We'd each one have our own bowl,
and a paper sack;
We's slip our fingers through the hull,
Then throw it empty back.
At last, when all the shells lay empty,
And a tub of peas was done;
We'd let the grownups take the haul,
Then look for some new fun.
Copyright 2008 Patricia Neely-Dorsey

Recommended Southern Dish of the Day

HOTWATER CORNBREAD
Ingredients

• 1 cup white cornmeal
• 1 teaspoon salt
• 1 teaspoon sugar
• 1/2 cup milk
• 1-1/4 cup boiling water

Instructions (Makes 10 servings)
• In a bowl, combine meal, salt and sugar.
• Stir in water until mixture is smooth. Slowly add milk.
• Drop by tablespoons into hot grease.
• Cook slowly for 6 minutes.
• Turn, cook about 5 minutes longer




Do you love the South?

Join Us Online at the Facebook "Celebrate the South" Group.

Visit Patricia Neely-Dorsey online at http://www.patricianeelydorsey.webs.com/.

Sunday, April 5, 2009

Coversations w/ Best Selling Author Brenda Hamptom


1. As a person what is your inspiration to write?
More than anything, I’m inspired by my readers who always seem to understand the important messages I put into my books. The love and support they show for my work truly keeps me going and inspires me to write more.

2. When did you discover you loved to write?
Writing was something I always enjoyed doing, but it wasn’t until I read Terry McMillan’s Disappearing Acts when I decided to write novels.

3. What was your first written piece and how did it feel to have accomplished such a task?
My first written piece was my memoir that hasn’t been published yet. My first published novel was Two’s Enough Three’s A Crowd, and releasing it was the greatest feeling ever. I often refer to it as having a newborn baby, and even though nothing compares to bringing my beautiful children in the world, releasing my first book came pretty close.

4. An Author’s career can be a difficult task, so how do you get into the zone to write your next book?
I do have to step into the “zone” to work on my books and that includes: ignoring phone calls, closing the door to my office, not making myself available to anyone and staying focused on which direction I want my novel to go.

5. Taking it back to your debut novel, how did it feel to hold your first book in your hand? Simply put…GOOD!!

6. Other then writing what is one of the things you love to do?
I really love to skate, but I haven’t had much time to do it. Since I can’t go to the rink as often as I would like to, sometimes I put on my skates and skate in front of my house. The kids join me too, making it a lot of fun.

7. When is all said and done what mark do you want to leave in the literary industry?
Currently, I have a reputation as being the “go to person” when aspiring writers want to know about the industry. I’m known for offering my honest opinion about the work individuals submit to me and many authors trust what I do. Through working as a literary representative and POD book publisher, my goal has always been to work with talented writers and assist them with finding their way. I want to be remembered as the author/agent/publisher…that gave a helping hand when others needed it.

Brenda Hampton
Essence Magazine Bestselling Author
www.brendamhampton.com
Novels:
Two Wrongs Don't Make a Right
The Dirty Truth
SLICK
How Can I Be Down?
No Justice No Peace
Naughty Series (Coming Jan. 2009)

July Book of the Month

Literary Events

  • Book Expo of America
  • Black Writers Conference
  • National Black Book Festival
  • National Book Club Conference

AAMBC Radio

Subscribe to AAMBC Reading Group

Powered by us.groups.yahoo.com

Blog viewed better in Modzilla Fire Fox